Another disappointing detecting session

I went out this afternoon hoping to be able to get back on the field which back in March produced a sudden flurry of finds, including spectacle buckles and the handle of a litten spoon. Surely the alpacas and rhea would have been moved to another field by now?

There were only sheep lying down in the dappled sunlight under the trees half way along the far side of the field. The coast was clear. I unpacked my rucksack in the shade of the hedge and started detecting. Quarter of an hour later, while on my knees and digging a hole, I looked up to see three adult alpacas and a youngster making a bee-line for me at a fast trot. Not all the sheep were sheep. The boldest two skidded to a halt about 10 feet from me and stood staring. They followed me around for the rest of the afternoon, one of them coming well within touching distance. He/she/it sniffed the coil of the detector, the headphones and Pro-pointer, breathed down my neck, sniffed my hand and eventually nuzzled my face and allowed me to stroke its nose. That one at least was obviously very tame though the others were generally warier.

Unfortunately it was a crap afternoon’s detecting. Although I was working the same area of the same field as a few months ago nothing but rubbish came up, including both halves of broken biro, the inevitable pieces of foil, a corroded metal disk that was the size and weight of an old penny but which had become bright red and orange on one side, broken fragments of green-painted metal and a few small lumps of scrap lead.

So what was going on? I suspect the problem is that the soil is much drier at present than it was in March. There are probably other reasonable finds in that field but they can only be found when the soil conditions are right, ie wetter.

As if that was not bad enough, Tect O Trak stopped tracking me early in the afternoon. Since getting home and doing an internet search, I’ve discovered that some Galaxy S5 phones have been experiencing problems with GPS since downloading Lollipop. Hmmm. Guess who downloaded Lollipop a few days ago. Hopefully it’s an easy fix.

Disappointing as I say. If the weather is decent next weekend I will try to get on one of my new permissions for a change.

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Large gold nugget found in Scotland

A nugget of gold found in a river in the Southern Uplands is thought to be the most significant discovery in Scotland in the past 70 years.

The 20 carat golden nugget, which weighed about 18.1g (0.6oz), has an estimated value of £10,000.

It was discovered by a Canadian man during a gold panning course near Wanlockhead in the Lowther Hills.

However the man, known as John, was so unimpressed by his discovery, he almost threw it back in the water.

Large gold nugget worth £10,000 found near Wanlockhead

At little over half an ounce, its real bullion value is less than £500. God knows where they get £10,000 from, unless it’s from Scottish sentimentality.