Woof!

Metal detectorists find 1,700-year-old bronze statue of Roman dog with its tongue hanging out in first find of its kind in UK

A unique Roman ‘licking dog’ never before seen in Britain has been found by two metal detector enthusiasts.

The exquisite bronze figure, which measures about 8.5-inches tall and 2-inches wide, has minutely detailed eyelashes and teeth.

The dog is sticking out its tongue and experts say it is an example of a healing statue, which may have come previously-undiscovered healing temple.

It dates from AD318 to AD450 and was found in Gloucestershire where another healing temple has already been found at Lydney.

Read all abaht it

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The old round £1 after 15 October 2017

The current £1 coin will lose its legal tender status at midnight on 15 October 2017. After the 15 October, the current round £1 coin can continue to be deposited into a customer’s account at most High Street Banks in the UK.

Just as well, considering we’ll be finding the buggers for decades, though frankly depositing the odd one or two is going to be a pain in the arse unless the banks will also exchange them OTC.

http://www.royalmint.com/newonepoundcoin

Roman coin handed back to landowner

Having received the FLO’s report on what was confirmed to be part of the socket of a cross, I went over to the farm to hand back the artefact and the print-out of the report from the PAS database entry. I also wanted to hand over the Claudius II radiate as I thought the landowner would be interested to know what I’d found on his land.

Neither the landowner nor his son was around so I gave both the cross fragment and the Claudius II radiate and their PAS printouts to the estate secretary and asked her to pass them to the landowner for me.

Talking to the secretary confirmed what I’d heard anecdotally – that the harvest this year was expected to be several weeks early. The farm was gearing up to beginning harvest the following week and by the end of the week land should be detectable once again. Happy Days!

Having brought with me the field plans given to me last year by the landowner’s son, I outlined the fields I would particularly like to have a crack at and why.

I have hopes. Big hopes.

FLO night at the club

Along I toddled to collect the items handed over back in early April. There were only the two of them as I’d done bugger all detecting over the winter and spring.

One was the Funny Looking Doodah that the son of the owner of my biggest permission showed me last autumn and asked if I knew what it was. The FLO confirmed her initial thoughts that this was part of the base of a cross, dating from anywhere between 1000AD and 1200AD, which now has me wondering where exactly it was found (the farmer’s son was rather vague when he showed it to me) as it might be evidence for a church or chapel on the land.

The other was the corroded Roman coin mentioned in the entry dated 25/10/2016 which was identified as a copper alloy radiate of Claudius II dating to the period AD 270-271, with a CONSECRATIO reverse.

Clubs – “They’re only interested in old stuff”

Delivering a package for collection to one of the local convenience stores, I noticed a black guy with tied-back dreadlocks detecting behind the goalmouth on the community footy pitch in front of the store. He was using an entry level Yellow Peril, but unlike many users he was at least using headphones.

So I wandered over to see how he was getting on.

He told me he’d found a couple of pound coins so far – enough to buy a bottle of cider.

Was he a member of any local clubs, I asked.

“No,” quoth he. “They’re only interested in old stuff.”

He was only interested in finding loose change. As long as he kept himself in cider he was a happy bunny.

I left him to it.

I think he’s the first black guy I’ve seen detecting though I know there must be others out there. We do seem to be a very white lot, we detectorists.

FLO night at the club

Along I went to collect the items handed in in September and to hand over the latest batch.

Finds from Thame area dig – blog entry dated 1 September 2016

The flint was recorded as a Mesolithic or Neolithic rejuvenation flake dating to 8,300 – 2,100 BCE. The  Lizzy Halfgroat is London mint dating to 1591 – 1594 AD. The Roman coin was confirmed as a commemorative copper alloy nummus of Theodora dating to 337 – 341 AD.

Finds from Witney area dig – blog entry dated 5 September 2016

The book clasp was confirmed as being of a copper alloy and dating to anywhere between 1500 and 1700. The curtain ring is a very ordinary copper alloy ring of mediaeval or post-mediaeval date so from anywhere between the 14th and 18th centuries. The rounded button was judged to be of 18th century date and not recorded.

Find from XP rally near Burford

The Roman coin was identified as a radiate of an unknown emperor but dated to somewhere between 260 AD and 296 AD.

The FLO took from me:

1 musket ball
1 possible musket ball
1 copper alloy ring which may be of Roman date
4 Roman coins
1 small piece of grey pottery (possibly Roman)
1 small iron nail or tack – probably a Roman boot or sandal hobnail
1 piece of reddish-orangey stone which shows possible signs of having been worked to some extent.

Sadly, all the lumps of curved orangey-pink rough ceramic are just modern drainage pipe. Bang goes my Roman building. Eheu!