Yorkshire Museum buys £30,000 Iron Age torc

The Yorkshire Museum has bought the second of two Iron Age torcs, believed to be the first jewellery from the era found in the north, following a successful public fundraising campaign.

Natalie McCaul, the assistant curator of archaeology at the Yorkshire Museum, with the Brigante torcs.

Generous donations from the public and funding bodies have allowed the second of two ancient torcs, both discovered at Towton, near Tadcaster, to be reunited with its sister ring at the Yorkshire Museum.

Found by metal detectorists in 2010 and 2011, buried within metres of each other, the torcs represent the first gold Iron Age jewellery ever found in the north of England. They have been separated since the museum bought the first torc for £25,000 in January 2012.

Yorkshire Museum buys £30,000 Iron Age torc after public appeal succeeds

British Museum to show Viking treasures from North Yorkshire

A major new exhibition featuring Viking finds from North Yorkshire will take place at the British Museum next year.

Vikings: Life And Legend is the first major exhibition on Vikings to be held at the London museum for more than 30 years, and will include artefacts from the Vale of York alongside items from around the UK and Ireland, and the museum’s own collection.

The Vale of York Hoard, which was found by metal detectorists near Harrogate in 2007, will be shown in its entirety for the first time since it was found and jointly acquired by the British Museum and York Museums Trust.

The hoard includes 617 coins, six arm rings and a quantity of bullion and hack-silver, and is considered the largest and most important Viking hoard to be found since 1840’s Cuerdale Hoard, part of which will also will also be included in the exhibition.

The exhibition runs at the Sainsbury Exhibitions Gallery between March 6 and June 22 next year.

British Museum to show Viking treasures from North Yorkshire

Treasure dig organiser does not have a valid claim to cash from haul

A man who organised a metal detecting event has been told at an inquest that he does not have a valid claim to a haul of Treasure Trove recovered from a suspected Anglo-Saxon grave.

Deputy Coroner Geoff Fell told James Pincher, from Darlington, he would be advising the British Museum that he is not entitled to a share of any money from items found at a dig at Busks Farm, near Middleham, North Yorkshire.

Items found on the dig, attended by around ten people, between April 16 and 17, 2011, include a gold coin, gold pommel, copper alloy mount, iron sword and dagger, copper alloy pommel and three copper alloy hooks.

Not all items were recorded with the Finds Liaison Office straight away, and there are still five silver coins missing that Mr Fell called to be returned – but said he would be handing his file to police and the Crown Prosecution Service.

Treasure dig organiser does not have a valid claim to cash from haul

So the moral of the story is: if you find treasure, DECLARE IT. ALL OF IT.