Cornwall mud finds are declared treasure

Items found in Cornish mud will be shown to the public after being declared treasure.

The items include a silver Tudor dress hook, a solid silver bodkin – a type of hairpin, made in 1657 – and an inscribed gold ring.

They were found by metal detectorists who are required by law to report valuable finds.

They will be on show in the Hands on History Hub exhibition from 12 March at the Royal Cornwall Museum.

Cornwall mud finds are declared treasure

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‘Lost’ Civil War battlefield added to English Heritage register

The “lost” site of a Civil War battle, where the Royalists inflicted their biggest defeat on the Parliamentarians, has been added to English Heritage’s register of battlefields following new research.

The fighting took place at two separate battles, fought around ten days apart, over August and September 1644, near Lostwithiel, Cornwall.

The Royalists had tracked a heavily outnumbered Parliamentarian army to the town and gradually closed in on them. King Charles I himself was present during the campaign and is said to have slept in a hedge. Part of the fighting centred around the ruins of Restormel Castle.

The Parliamentarians had hoped that their navy would be able to navigate into the Fowey estuary to evacuate their troops, but unfavourable weather conditions prevented this. In the end, 6,000 men surrendered and the Parliamentarian leader, the Earl of Essex, was able to escape only after being taken off in a fishing boat.

‘Lost’ Civil War battlefield added to English Heritage register