Large gold nugget found in Scotland

A nugget of gold found in a river in the Southern Uplands is thought to be the most significant discovery in Scotland in the past 70 years.

The 20 carat golden nugget, which weighed about 18.1g (0.6oz), has an estimated value of £10,000.

It was discovered by a Canadian man during a gold panning course near Wanlockhead in the Lowther Hills.

However the man, known as John, was so unimpressed by his discovery, he almost threw it back in the water.

Large gold nugget worth £10,000 found near Wanlockhead

At little over half an ounce, its real bullion value is less than £500. God knows where they get £10,000 from, unless it’s from Scottish sentimentality.

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Bronze Age lock-rings declared treasure

Two Bronze Age gold rings which were found by a metal detectorist on farm land in Wrexham have been declared treasure by a coroner.

The lock-rings – worn either as earrings or in the hair by a person of wealth and status about 3,000 years ago – were discovered in Rossett.

The ornaments will now go on display in Wrexham County Borough Museum.

Bronze Age rings found in Rossett, Wrexham, declared treasure

Gold in faeces ‘is worth millions’

Fortunes could be saved from going down the drain by extracting gold and precious metals from human excrement, scientists suggest.

Sewage sludge contains traces of gold, silver and platinum at levels that would be seen as commercially viable by traditional prospectors. “The gold we found was at the level of a minimal mineral deposit,” said Kathleen Smith, of the US Geological Survey.

Smith and her colleagues argue that extracting metals from waste could also help limit the release of harmful metals, such as lead, into the environment in fertilisers and reduce the amount of toxic sewage that has to be buried or burnt.

“If you can get rid of some of the nuisance metals that currently limit how much of these biosolids we can use on fields and forests, and at the same time recover valuable metals and other elements, that’s a win-win,” she said.

A previous study, by Arizona State University, estimated that a city of 1 million inhabitants flushed about $13m (£8.7m) worth of precious metals down toilets and sewer drains each year.

Gold in faeces ‘is worth millions and could save the environment’

Not sure I fancy taking the Deus into the sewers. Still, it seems to suggest that the UK could be flushing over half a billion quids worth of precious metals down the khazi every year. That’s almost £9 per person.

Cornwall mud finds are declared treasure

Items found in Cornish mud will be shown to the public after being declared treasure.

The items include a silver Tudor dress hook, a solid silver bodkin – a type of hairpin, made in 1657 – and an inscribed gold ring.

They were found by metal detectorists who are required by law to report valuable finds.

They will be on show in the Hands on History Hub exhibition from 12 March at the Royal Cornwall Museum.

Cornwall mud finds are declared treasure

Anglesey treasure hoard over 3,000 years old discovered

A late Bronze Age hoard of gold and copper thought to be around 3000 years old was unearthed on Anglesey .

The discovery is considered so important that it has been given the rare definition of ‘treasure’ by the coroner’s office.

They were found by a metal detecorist in Cwm Cadnant, and include a gold band – known as a hair ring – and an ear ring, which are believed to be examples of Bronze Age jewellery.

Detectorist Philip Cooper also found ingots, which would have been a form of early currency.

Anglesey treasure hoard over 3,000 years old discovered

Amazing Anglo-Saxon pendant found in Norfolk

In her role as one of the experts in Channel 4’s long-running Time Team series, Dr Helen Geake saw many exciting finds come to the surface. But the discovery of the stunning gold and jewel pendant, dug out of a muddy South Norfolk field and announced today, tops the lot.

The exquisite 7cm pendant is stunningly made with gold ‘cells’ and red garnet inlays. Some of the garnets have been cut to make animal ‘interlace’, a popular and highly-skilled design technique from the period where representations of creatures are stretched out and intricately interwoven.

But all of these discoveries were still in the future when Tom Lucking, a first-year UEA landscape archaeology student and keen member of the Suffolk Archaeological Field Group, was exploring the field – with the landowner’s permission – just before Christmas.

His detector found a large and deep signal, and he dug down just far enough to reveal the top of a bronze bowl. Instead of carrying on he did exactly the right thing: carefully re-filling the hole and calling in the Field Group’s geophysics team to survey the site, and Norfolk County Council’s Heritage Environment Service to assess any finds.

Amazing Anglo-Saxon pendant found in Norfolk

Amateur discovers Roman-era German treasure linked to Wagnerian Nibelung legend

A hobby archaeologist with a metal detector has discovered a trove of gold and silver in a German forest dating back to late Roman times, fuelling speculation that it could be the legendary Nibelung treasure which inspired composer Richard Wagner’s operatic “Ring Cycle”.

The haul from the western state of Rhineland Palatinate, which is worth about €1m, includes silver bowls, brooches and other jewellery from ceremonial robes, as well as small statues that would have adorned a grand chair, archaeologists say.

Amateur discovers Roman-era German treasure linked to Wagnerian Nibelung legend