Rare medieval St George ring found in Norfolk

A 600-year-old gold ring engraved with St George and the Dragon sheds new light on the saint’s medieval followers in Norwich, an expert has told the BBC.

The ring, found by a metal detectorist in South Creake, Norfolk, dates from between 1350 and 1430.

Dr Jonathan Good, author of The Cult of St George, said the ring “attests to the popularity of St George” and may be linked to a guild devoted to the saint.

The ring was ruled to be treasure at an inquest in Norwich this week.

It is set to be acquired by Norwich Castle Museum.

Rare medieval St George ring found in Norfolk

Bronze Age lock-rings declared treasure

Two Bronze Age gold rings which were found by a metal detectorist on farm land in Wrexham have been declared treasure by a coroner.

The lock-rings – worn either as earrings or in the hair by a person of wealth and status about 3,000 years ago – were discovered in Rossett.

The ornaments will now go on display in Wrexham County Borough Museum.

Bronze Age rings found in Rossett, Wrexham, declared treasure

Anglesey treasure hoard over 3,000 years old discovered

A late Bronze Age hoard of gold and copper thought to be around 3000 years old was unearthed on Anglesey .

The discovery is considered so important that it has been given the rare definition of ‘treasure’ by the coroner’s office.

They were found by a metal detecorist in Cwm Cadnant, and include a gold band – known as a hair ring – and an ear ring, which are believed to be examples of Bronze Age jewellery.

Detectorist Philip Cooper also found ingots, which would have been a form of early currency.

Anglesey treasure hoard over 3,000 years old discovered

‘Priceless’ trove of 2,000 10th century gold coins found off the coast of Israel

Scuba divers have uncovered the largest treasure trove ever discovered off Israel’s Mediterranean coast – but won’t get a penny.

The group initially thought they had found a toy coin on the ocean floor before tests confirmed the gold pieces were treasure.

Experts who eventually counted 2,000 pieces, dating back more than 1,000 years, described the discovery as ‘priceless.’ The coins are now property of the state with no finder’s fee for the divers.

Members of a diving club in the Roman-era port stumbled across the treasure, weighing nearly 20 pounds, by pure chance while on a dive.

‘The largest treasure of gold coins discovered in Israel was found in recent weeks on the seabed in the ancient harbour in Caesarea,’ said a statement by Israeli Antiquities Authority.

No finder’s fee – poor sods.

‘Priceless’ trove of 2,000 gold coins used by 10th Century Caliphate which once ruled much of the Middle East is found off the coast of Israel

Civil War soldier’s wages found in Taunton

Almost six month’s pay earned by a soldier fighting in the English Civil War will provide a windfall its finder.

The 18 silver and gold coins uncovered in a garden in Nerrols Farm, Taunton, totalled £5 5s 3¾d – 5½ months’ wages for a common soldier in the 17th Century and £450 in today’s value.

But the hoard, probably belonging to a Royalist soldier and left during the siege of Taunton in 1645, could fetch thousands of pounds when it is bought by the town’s Museum of Somerset.

Civil War soldier’s wages found in Taunton

It’s also possible that these were someone’s life savings, hidden before he went off to fight or simply for safekeeping in uncertain times.

Haul of medieval coins unearthed in Twynholm

FOR aspiring treasure hunters reluctant to brave the elements to find their bounty, it is proof that patience and persistence will reveal a silver lining.

Two men using metal detectors have uncovered what is believed to be Scotland’s largest ever haul of medieval silver coins after bracing atrocious gale-force weather.

Derek McLennan and Gus Paterson spent five hours in heavy rain and biting winds during their search near Kirkcudbright, and had been on the verge of calling it quits.

However, after “stumbling across” a few silver coins, they decided to press on with their hunt and eventually unearthed more than 300. The coins, which date from around 1249 to 1325, bear the profiles of monarchs including Alexander III of Scotland and John Balliol, who ruled from 1292 to 1296, as well as Edward I, Edward II and Edward III.

The find has now been declared to Scotland’s Treasure Trove, the body which ensures significant objects from the nation’s past are preserved in museums for public benefit.

Haul of medieval coins unearthed in Twynholm

Metal detectorists found nearly 1,000 treasure items in 2012

Amateur archaeologists with metal detectors found 990 items classified as treasure during 2012, according to figures from the British Museum.

All of the rare coins, rings and brooches contain gold or silver, and many date back more than 1,200 years.

The public reported more than 74,000 other historical items to the Portable Antiquities Scheme, which experts say has “revolutionised archaeology”.

More than 900,000 objects have been reported since it started in 1997.

The verification process takes several months, which is why the items submitted in 2012 are only being detailed now.

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum said the scheme, which launched its annual report today, was “ensuring that finds found by ordinary members of the public are rewriting history.”

Metal detectorists found nearly 1,000 treasure items in 2012